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Designing a 909 Clap in Reaktor

Posted on 16th January, by SteveF in Members, Reaktor Tutorials. 2 Comments
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This week’s members only tutorials is another great lesson from salamanderanagram, sharing how to recreate a 909 style clap in Native Instruments Reaktor.

 

Iconic Clap!

The Roland Designing a 909 Clap in Reaktor made a lasting impact on music production and is still widely emulated today, thirty years later!

Starting out with a simple noise oscillator, which is routed through a bandpass filter module, this sound quickly develops. Some time is spent on getting the right knobs in place and adjusting their sensitivity to help ensure the right action for later tweaking. Once all of this has been set up the sound is passed through a decay/release envelope. This will provide the reverb and presence that this classic clap sound is known for. All of this can then be sent through a mixer and to the main output. After you arrange the knobs on your panel view, you can begin building the second half of this 909 clap instrument.

A series of decay/release envelopes are introduced now that will also help control the delay effect for this 909 clap. It’s important to maintain the same control for all of the delay units, as well as the decay parameter of the envelopes, to ensure even and consistent delivery of the effect. Now all you need to do is rearrange the panel view so the new knobs are accessible and you can begin using this instrument!




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  • http://[email protected] mark

    this is great – i could use a little more explanation – especially about the things like the delay lines and delay to log function .. could you explain those a little more …?

    • salamanderangram

      Hi Mark,
      I’d be happy to explain anything unclear.
      The log values going into the decay times for the envelopes is because the envelopes in Reaktor take logarithmic time values. a value of 60 corresponds to 1 second, for example, while a value of 40 corresponds to 100 milliseconds. Using the Log (A) function translates between milliseconds (which we are using for the delay time) and logarithmic values, which we need for the envelope decay time.

      I hope that helps, thanks for the feedback!


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